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the work of history

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    Locals help tourists scale the Great Pyramid (1875), Félix Bonfils

    Library of Congress


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    Illustrations from Devises heroïques (1557), Claude Paradin

    University of Glasgow


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    Water Album: The Yellow River Breaches Its Course, The Waving Surface of the Autumn Flood, Clouds Rising from the Green Sea, Ten Thousand Riplets on the Yangzi (1160-1225), Ma Yuan 


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    I like learning about the Cold War and film history and late antebellum/American Civil War and postcolonialism and labor history, also Cuba throughout the 20th century, I like learning about the evolution/functions of the state.. I like art because I like looking at things but beyond that I don’t actually *know* art history. As a kid I was so into Bible history, and I’m trying to learn more about that, but beyond the actual Bible…haha.. I also like historiography, some of it is really circular and pointless but it also makes learning history an evolving conversation and not something static. Obviously all that’s incredibly broad and encompasses so much so I don’t mean to lump things that are otherwise totally dissimilar together, but I guess the only thing truly idgaf about is hard technical military stuff


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    Cityscape I (1963), Richard Diebenkorn


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    Angel greeting, Luc Olivier-Merson


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    Ruins of temple, Baalbek, Lebanon (1870-1885)

    Library of Congress


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    April 24, 1955: Heads of state of African and Asian nations convene at the Bandung Conference.

    Sixty years ago in Bandung, Indonesia, representatives from twenty-nine countries across Asia and Africa gathered to discuss their collective future in the turmoil of the Cold War and in the aftermath of, for many of these nations, the end of formal colonialism. Its principal organizers were Indonesia, Burma, Pakistan, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and India. Also present were colossal figures of Third World decolonization and anti-imperialist efforts, to name a few: Jawaharlal Nehru, Gamal Abdel Nasser, Ho Chi Minh and Nguyen Thi Binh, Nelson Mandela, Ben Bella, U Nu, and Indonesia’s own Sukarno. China’s exuberant Zhou Enlai was also present at the conference, where he alternately worried and placated other leaders about his country’s intentions. 

    Many of these leaders and the populations they claimed to represent constituted the whole of the national social and class hierarchy - that broad spectrum included the interests of the wealthy bourgeoisie, the peasants, the workers, the landlords and industrial elites. Even across those countries that gathered in Bandung, often the only common factor was a shared history of colonialism and anticolonialist struggle. Their leaders included self-described Marxists and conservatives and all else in between. Sukarno acknowledged this when he declared that the countries were united not by “skins” or “religion” but by “a common detestation of colonialism in whatever form it appears… by a common determination to preserve and stabilize peace in the world.” Their principal goals, it was decided, would be to promote universal human rights and national sovereignty, to combat neocolonialism, to replace war, arms proliferation, and coercion with peaceful arbitration as the principal means of international intercourse. There were also considerations of spurring economic development and attaining economic independence through coordination.  

    The United States, naturally wary of a conference of Third World leaders with an independent agenda, did not officially send a representative. Adam Clayton Powell, a black representative in the U.S. Congress, was in attendance against the advice of the State Department. He noted that the conference was “anti-American foreign policy” and that it would “become an anti-white movement unless a narrow-minded and unskilled American foreign policy is revised.” Another American, Richard Wright, was in attendance; in 1956 he published The Color Curtain, an account of the conference, and observed:

    What had these nations in common? Nothing, it seemed to me, but what their past relationship to the Western world had made them feel. This meeting of the rejected was in itself a kind of judgment upon the Western world.

    Wright’s sentiment, and the sentiment of many intellectuals in the optimistic early years of postcolonialism, gave rise to a phrase: the “spirit of Bandung” - a blunt rejection of economic and cultural marginalization of the world’s exploited nations by its powerful ones, plus a great faith in global institutions like the United Nations, and a great faith in the potential for international coordination. Substantial and irreconcilable rifts divided these leaders and their national interests not long after, but much that transpired in these countries in the years following 1955, including conferences in Cairo (1961), Belgrade (1961), and Havana (1966), social reform attempts, postcolonial developmental efforts, etc., followed in the “spirit of Bandung.”


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    ravenclaw-wit:

    This photograph is the only evidence or knowledge I have of a family that existed before or even during the Armenian Genocide, or as we say in Armenian, Medz Yeghern (“Great Crime.”) It was taken in Morenig, Kharpert, circa 1890, a place that now only exists in the remaining shards of Armenian history. The young girl sitting in the lower right corner in the striped dress is my grandfather’s mother – my great-grandmother, Sara. The microscopic amount I know of her story is pieced together from fragments, and I know nothing regarding the names or fates of anyone else in the photograph.

    Media coverage of the Armenian Genocide and demands for recognition have been at an all-time high these past few weeks, and for that I am grateful. But on April 24, Armenian Martyrs’ Day, we must center the 1.5 million that were murdered, and the overwhelming sense of loss and erased history that haunts Armenian families – history that was intentionally, violently eradicated with the goal of acting like it was never there in the first place, because that calculated destruction is, above all else, the central component of genocide.


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    unhistorical:

    April 24, 1955: Heads of state of African and Asian nations convene at the Bandung Conference.

    Sixty years ago in Bandung, Indonesia, representatives from twenty-nine countries across Asia and Africa gathered to discuss their collective future in the turmoil of the Cold War and in the aftermath of, for many of these nations, the end of formal colonialism. Its principal organizers were Indonesia, Burma, Pakistan, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and India. Also present were colossal figures of Third World decolonization and anti-imperialist efforts, to name a few: Jawaharlal Nehru, Gamal Abdel Nasser, Ho Chi Minh and Nguyen Thi Binh, Nelson Mandela, Ben Bella, U Nu, and Indonesia’s own Sukarno. Zhou Enlai of China was also present at the conference, where he alternately worried and placated other leaders about his country’s intentions. 

    Many of these leaders and the populations they claimed to represent constituted the whole of the national social and class hierarchy - that included the interests of the wealthy bourgeoisie, the peasants, the workers, the landlords and industrial elites. Even across those countries that gathered in Bandung, often the only common factor was a shared history of colonialism and anticolonialist struggle. Their leaders included self-described Marxists and conservatives and all else in between. Sukarno acknowledged this when he declared that the countries were united not by “skins” or “religion” but by “a common detestation of colonialism in whatever form it appears… by a common determination to preserve and stabilize peace in the world.” Their principal goals, it was decided, would be to promote universal human rights and national sovereignty, to combat neocolonialism, to replace war, arms proliferation, and coercion with peaceful arbitration as the principal means of international intercourse. There were also considerations of spurring economic development and attaining economic independence through coordination.  

    The United States, naturally wary of a conference of Third World leaders with an independent agenda, did not officially send a representative. Adam Clayton Powell, a black representative in the U.S. Congress, was in attendance against the advice of the State Department. He noted that the conference was “anti-American foreign policy” and that it would “become an anti-white movement unless a narrow-minded and unskilled American foreign policy is revised.” Another American, Richard Wright, was in attendance; in 1956 he published The Color Curtain, an account of the conference, and observed:

    What had these nations in common? Nothing, it seemed to me, but what their past relationship to the Western world had made them feel. This meeting of the rejected was in itself a kind of judgment upon the Western world.

    Wright’s sentiment, and the sentiment of many intellectuals in the optimistic early years of postcolonialism, gave rise to a phrase: the “spirit of Bandung” - a blunt rejection of economic and cultural marginalization by the world’s powerful nations, plus a great faith in global institutions like the United Nations, and great faith in the potential for international coordination. Substantial and irreconcilable rifts divided these leaders and their national interests not long after, but much that transpired in these countries in the years following 1955, including conferences in Cairo (1961), Belgrade (1961), and Havana (1966), social reform attempts, postcolonial developmental efforts, etc., followed in the “spirit of Bandung.”


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    1. A section of “barber’s row” - Enterprising refugees among the hundreds of thousands of Greeks and Armenians who fled from Asia Minor to Greece have set up stools, boxes, chairs and everything that can be sat on in a long row on the quay in Piraeus, the seaport of Athens, and shave and cut the hair of customers (1922)

    2. Armenian refugees from Istanbul, assisted by Near East Relief, farming in field, Rodosto, Thrace (1915-1923)

    3. Refugees waiting for work at Marsavan (1915-1923)

    4. Armenian refugees on Black Sea beach, gathered around seated person, Novorossiĭsk, Russia (1920)

    5. Widows and children (1915-1920)

    Library of Congress


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    yahoonewsphotos:

    Funeral services for Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland

    Family and friends gathered Monday for the funeral of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man whose death in custody triggered a fresh wave of protests over US police tactics.

    Thousands of people arrived at the New Shiloh Baptist church to pay final respects to Gray, who died on April 19 of severe spinal injuries, a week after his arrest in Baltimore. (AFP)

    Photos by: (from top) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    See more images from the funeral service and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!


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    I live in Baltimore and there is so much going around right now in the media and on the Internet, much of it totally ignorant in the same vein as all the ignorance that surrounded similar demonstrations across the country in the past few months. But some of it is especially heartbreaking and upsetting to read because it also obviously rests on these heartless and preconceived notions about Baltimore and the people here. Recent events aside, the people of Baltimore City get constantly dehumanized and shat on by the media and by people who have never even been here. Here are some articles that provide some measure of background about how Freddie Gray died and about the context that killed him. Far from covering the whole breadth of what is happening and what has been happening for a long time, they only scratch the surface of a context that’s absolutely not strictly limited to relations between the police and communities. There is so much more beyond that and the info here, so please keep that in mind as well. 

    A series in the Sun from a few months ago about millions of dollars in settlements paid to victims of police brutality

    ACLU: Plaintiffs win justice in illegal arrests lawsuit settlement with the Baltimore City Police Department 

    ACLU of Maryland: Briefing paper finds at least 109 police-involved killings since 2010

    In-custody death brings anger with police in East Baltimore: Police still investigating death of Anthony Anderson, 46

    Tyrone West files show passenger’s account of death in police custody

    Baltimore’s Newly Approved Youth Curfew among Strictest in Nation

    The police officers’ bill of rights

    Some Baltimore police officers face repeated misconduct lawsuits

    Helena Hicks talks about institutional neglect in the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested

    Baltimoreans Reflect on Freddie Gray and Their City

    Policing with impunity: How judges let dubious police tactics flourish

    What happened to Freddie Gray? Former cops and arrestees shed light on the question tearing Baltimore apart

    Whistleblower cop Joseph Crystal recalls his battles with Baltimore’s blue wall of silence

    Family attorney at Freddie Gray funeral: ‘Most of us knew a lot of Freddie Grays. Too many’

    Bad Seeds: Baltimore police misconduct profiled in lawsuits portrays a department beset by costly allegations of illegal violence and dishonesty

    Family members break down and anger about police treatment flares at a rally in West Baltimore yesterday

    Baltimore native Ta-Nehisi Coates: Officials calling for calm can offer no rational justification for Gray’s death, and so they appeal for order

    NPR’s Scott Simon takes a walk through the neighborhoods of West Baltimore to talk with residents in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death in police custody


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    unhistorical:

    I live in Baltimore and there is so much going around right now in the media and on the Internet, much of it totally ignorant in the same vein as all the ignorance that surrounded similar demonstrations across the country in the past few months. But some of it is especially heartbreaking and upsetting to read because it also obviously rests on these heartless and preconceived notions about Baltimore and the people here. Recent events aside, the people of Baltimore City get constantly dehumanized and shat on by the media and by people who have never even been here. Here are some articles that provide some measure of background about how Freddie Gray died and about the context that killed him. Far from covering the whole breadth of what is happening and what has been happening for a long time, they only scratch the surface of a context that’s absolutely not strictly limited to relations between the police and communities. There is so much more beyond that and the info here, so please keep that in mind as well. 

    A series in the Sun from a few months ago about millions of dollars in settlements paid to victims of police brutality

    ACLU: Plaintiffs win justice in illegal arrests lawsuit settlement with the Baltimore City Police Department 

    ACLU of Maryland: Briefing paper finds at least 109 police-involved killings since 2010

    In-custody death brings anger with police in East Baltimore: Police still investigating death of Anthony Anderson, 46

    Tyrone West files show passenger’s account of death in police custody

    Baltimore’s Newly Approved Youth Curfew among Strictest in Nation

    The police officers’ bill of rights

    Some Baltimore police officers face repeated misconduct lawsuits

    Helena Hicks talks about institutional neglect in the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived and was arrested

    Baltimoreans Reflect on Freddie Gray and Their City

    Policing with impunity: How judges let dubious police tactics flourish

    What happened to Freddie Gray? Former cops and arrestees shed light on the question tearing Baltimore apart

    Whistleblower cop Joseph Crystal recalls his battles with Baltimore’s blue wall of silence

    Family attorney at Freddie Gray funeral: ‘Most of us knew a lot of Freddie Grays. Too many’

    Bad Seeds: Baltimore police misconduct profiled in lawsuits portrays a department beset by costly allegations of illegal violence and dishonesty

    Family members break down and anger about police treatment flares at a rally in West Baltimore yesterday

    Baltimore native Ta-Nehisi Coates: Officials calling for calm can offer no rational justification for Gray’s death, and so they appeal for order.

    NPR’s Scott Simon takes a walk through the neighborhoods of West Baltimore to talk with residents in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death in police custody


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    April 30, 1975: The People’s Army of Vietnam and Việt Cộng capture the South Vietnamese capital of Saigon, formally ending a twenty-year-long conflict.

    1. South Vietnamese soldiers abandon their uniforms in an effort to protect themselves after the successful Communist invasion.

    2. A CIA agent assists South Vietnamese evacuees onto an Air American helicopter during the fall of Saigon in April 1975.

    3. Captured South Vietnamese soldiers sit on the lawn outside the presidential palace in Saigon.

    4. Traffic snarls the streets of South Vietnam as citizens try to make their way to Saigon.

    5. A soldier aims his gun as citizens climb the gates of the U.S. Embassy.

    6. Celebrations mark the fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975, an event that ended the Vietnam War.

    7. A Vietnamese man prays in front of a portrait of Ho Chi Minh after the fall of Saigon.

    Gallery: The Fall of Saigon


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    jobhaver:

    for real theres a lot of talk online today about how marriage equality—while it does provide some important benefits to people other than just the middle and upper class persons who stand to benefit the most from it (e.g., immigration, custody rights, etc)—doesn’t address some of the severe problems that the LGBT communities face, especially segments which are disadvantaged on the basis of race or class: discrimination, suicide, homelessness, et cetera.

    here are some good causes you can help out with to address some of these persistent issues in the trans community especially:

    transhousingnetwork.com - many trans and gender nonconforming people still do not feel safe in homeless shelters despite experiencing high levels of housing discrimination and homelessness. if you can take in a trans or gender nonconforming couch surfer for a couple nights, you can submit a “have couch” post on here.

    Trans Lifeline - trans lifeline is a crisis hotline for trans persons staffed by trans persons aimed at tackling the issue of trans suicide. you can donate here or apply to volunteer here.

    Casa Ruby - casa ruby is a program which runs an LGBT drop in center, transitional housing, and many other important social programs for LGBT (focusing on trans and gender non-conforming persons) in the washington dc area. you can donate here


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    The first decade of San Francisco Pride (for most of the 1970s, called “Gay Freedom Day”). The theme of the first event, the 1970 “Christopher Street Liberation Day Gay-In,” was “Freedom Day Revolution.” 

    SFGate


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    An abbreviated timeline of the AIDS crisis, from the 1993 San Francisco Pride Guide (note: PWA: Person/People With AIDS)

    SF Pride


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    High Noon (1949)


    Night Windows (1928)


    Rooms By the Sea (1951)


    Summer Evening (1949)


    Nighthawks (1942)


    House by the Railroad (1925)


    New York Office (1962)


    Morning Sun (1952)


    New York Movie (1939)


    Office in a Small City (1953)

    Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 – May 15, 1967)

    Hopper was fascinated by what isn’t available to our senses. In his mysterious paintings, he makes felt what isn’t there, the nothing, the nothing that isn’t there. He was known to be solitary and thoughtful, like the blond woman in New York Movie. In the forties and fifties, it was easier to appreciate solitude than it is today. Hopper painted public places, rooms where people gathered, but usually with a few people or nobody in the rooms. Few people in those days went to museums during the week, and the galleries might be vacant. 

    You could stand before a painting for long minutes and not hear voices. There was silence in those days. It was associated with solitude, sacredness, internal life.

    Leonard Michaels, “The Nothing That Isn’t There”


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