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the work of history

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    Quotes from Einstein the socialist, civil rights activist, and suspected communist:

    My trip to this institution was in behalf of a worthwhile cause. There is a separation of colored people from white people in the United States. That separation is not a disease of colored people. It is a disease of white people. I do not intend to be quiet about it.

    The economic anarchy of capitalist society as it exists today is, in my opinion, the real source of the evil. We see before us a huge community of producers the members of which are unceasingly striving to deprive each other of the fruits of their collective labor—not by force, but on the whole in faithful compliance with legally established rules.

    This crippling of individuals I consider the worst evil of capitalism. Our whole educational system suffers from this evil. An exaggerated competitive attitude is inculcated into the student, who is trained to worship acquisitive success as a preparation for his future career.

    Many a sincere person will answer: “Our attitude towards Negroes is the result of unfavorable experiences which we have had by living side by side with Negroes in this country. They are not our equals in intelligence, sense of responsibility, reliability.”

    I am firmly convinced that whoever believes this suffers from a fatal misconception. Your ancestors dragged these black people from their homes by force; and in the white man’s quest for wealth and an easy life they have been ruthlessly suppressed and exploited, degraded into slavery.  The modern prejudice against Negroes is the result of the desire to maintain this unworthy condition.


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act I, No. 9 Finale


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 10 Scène


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 11 Scène


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    Art for Metropolis c. 1926-7, Boris Bilinsky.


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    March 20, 1854: The United States Republican Party is founded.

    In early March 1854, the U.S. Senate passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which provided for the organization of the eponymous territories and deferred the issue of slavery in both to popular sovereignty. The act effectively overturned the almost sacred Missouri Compromise of 1820, which, for the past three decades, had successfully discouraged conflict between anti- and pro-slavery factions. In reaction to the act, and to the possible expansion of slavery north of the line decreed by the Missouri Compromise, a group primarily composed of ex-members of the nearly defunct Whig Party met in Wisconsin in early 1854. In July of 1854, the Republican Party was officially founded in Jackson, Michigan.

    The early Republican Party was united by its rejection of the expansion of slavery, for moral, political, and economic reasons: free-market capitalism and free labor, it was argued, was the superior and more American system. Others feared the disproportionate political power held by slave-owning plantation oligarchs. Naturally, the entirety of party organizational efforts took place in the North. The 1856 Party platform rejected the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and any efforts to expand slavery into free territories; it also supported the construction of a transcontinental railroad and the “improvement of rivers and harbors… for the accommodation and security of our existing commerce”. Its first candidate for the presidency was John C. Frémont, who lost the election to James Buchanan but earned a sizable 38.5% of the popular vote. His campaign slogan, “Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, and Frémont”, was lifted from the platform of the Free Soil Party.


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    March 20, 1854: The United States Republican Party is founded.

    In early March 1854, the U.S. Senate passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which provided for the organization of the eponymous territories and deferred the issue of slavery in both to popular sovereignty. The act effectively overturned the almost sacred Missouri Compromise of 1820, which, for the past three decades, had successfully discouraged conflict between anti- and pro-slavery factions. In reaction to the act, and to the possible expansion of slavery north of the line decreed by the Missouri Compromise, a group primarily composed of ex-members of the nearly defunct Whig Party met in Wisconsin in early 1854. In July of 1854, the Republican Party was officially founded in Jackson, Michigan.

    The early Republican Party was united by its rejection of the expansion of slavery, for moral, political, and economic reasons: free-market capitalism and free labor, it was argued, was the superior and more American system. Others feared the disproportionate political power held by slave-owning plantation oligarchs. Naturally, the entirety of party organizational efforts took place in the North. The 1856 Party platform rejected the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and any efforts to expand slavery into free territories; it also supported the construction of a transcontinental railroad and the “improvement of rivers and harbors… for the accommodation and security of our existing commerce”. Its first candidate for the presidency was John C. Frémont, who lost the election to James Buchanan but earned a sizable 38.5% of the popular vote. His campaign slogan, “Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, and Frémont”, was lifted from the platform of the Free Soil Party.


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    Ufa (Universum Film AG) German film posters from the 1920s:

    - The Golem: How He Came into the World (1920), Paul Wegener & Carl Boese

    The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), Robert Wiene

    Die Nibelungen (1924), Fritz Lang

    Metropolis (1927), Fritz Lang

    The Last Laugh (1924), F.W. Murnau

    Faust (1926), F.W. Murnau


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 12 Scène


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    Japanese poster for Asphalt (1929)


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    Lofty Mount Lu/廬山高 (1467), Shen Zhou

    Full painting


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 13 Danse de cygnes: Odette solo & Valse


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 13 Danse des petits cygnes


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 13 Danse des cygnes: Odette et le prince


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act II, No. 14 Scène


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act III, No. 15 March


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    Sirin and AlkonostThe Birds of Joy and Sorrow (1896), Viktor Vasnetsov


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act III, No. 16 Ballabile: Dance of the Corps de Ballet and the Dwarves


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    Vincent van Gogh (March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890)

    I haven’t got it yet, but I’m hunting it and fighting for it, I want something serious, something fresh—something with soul in it! Onward, onward.


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    Swan LakeOp. 20 (1877), Act III, No. 17 Entrance of the Guests and Waltz 


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